Posted by: dohgonuniversity | August 20, 2009

V8-7

“Really the only people who understand PTSD are the ones who have it.”
http://pagingdrgupta.blogs.cnn.com/2009/08/18/marine-veteran-fights-an-invisible-battle/

…war is the foyer to hell; hell is when you come home from war and have to deal with what you’ve done and what you witnessed in war.
http://mennonista.blogspot.com/2009/08/how-does-one-unpack-from-war.html

Soldiers clearly need help. The problem, however, is that the program is unlikely to succeed.
http://www.prospect.org/csnc/blogs/tapped_archive?month=08&year=2009&base_name=making_soldiers_fit_for_battle

…studies are beginning to surface about Secondary PTSD — a mental health issue that has been lurking around in this country since at least the Vietnam War. Secondary PTSD has shown up when the spouse and/or family respond to their changed environment with anger, substance abuse or violence, replacing a peaceful and loving home life.
http://bluestarfamilies.wordpress.com/2009/08/19/wars-silent-stress-the-family-at-home/

The Army is set to introduce a new mental-health test of unprecedented size and scope as part of its increasing efforts to improve soldiers’ mental wellness amid the strain of repeated deployments.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2009/0820/p02s01-usmi.html

“I’m still not sure that our culture is ready to accept this… that’s what I worry about most.”
http://www.lohud.com/article/20090820/OPINION/908200490/1015/OPINION01/Army-strong

…the families try to manage on their own, treading carefully, yet all the while realizing that what they thought would be a return to normal life is starting to look like a bad dream that won’t end.
http://bluestarfamilies.wordpress.com/2009/08/20/reintegration-phase-11-excerpt-from-400-days/

“The tone and culture in the VA is changing.”
http://www.kgw.com/sharedcontent/APStories/stories/D9A69R1G0.html

PTSD Therapy: Are they Fakers & Charlatans?
http://www.salem-news.com/articles/august182009/ptsd_fakers_8-17-09.php

Earlier diagnosis could improve treatment outcome, and might even prevent soldiers with undetected problems from being redeployed. But even better would be stopping wartime stress at the source.
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2009/08/militarys-plan-for-ptsd-early-diagnosis-good-prevention-better/

Dr. Chavez’s research provides hope that this nonverbal, physical medicine can safely and effectively work with the underlying aspects of chronic physical issues that ensue from trauma, including PTSD.
http://in.sys-con.com/node/1076246

Iraq War Vet kills girlfriend, then himself
“Everybody said he was in a good mood at work. He was fine when I talked to him Sunday night.”
http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20090818/ARTICLES/908189960/1052/OBITS?Title=Fort-Bragg-Iraq-war-vet-kills-girlfriend-then-himself

There is some evidence (although statistical data was lost), that the use of [General Semantic] methods with thousands of troops may have had something to do with the reduced number of psychiatric casualties during the D-Day invasion (as compared with previous Allied invasions in North Africa and Italy).
http://korzybskifiles.blogspot.com/2009/08/helping-soldiers-and-veterans-re-adjust.html

“He remembers what went on over there. Just a gunshot alone will set him off because he served in it.”
http://www.kgwn.tv/story.aspx?ID=2752&Cat=2

“It is a way of looking at your psychological health as important as your physical health.”
http://www.army.mil/-news/2009/08/19/26221-soldiers-learn-to-impart-mental-toughness-on-others/

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